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Q: How did you go about rebranding Turner networks, such as TNT (“We know drama”) and TBS (“Very funny”)?

A: In 1999, cable was exploding. The networks had to become brands. We did a tremendous amount of psychographic research that I learned at Coke. What’s in people hearts and minds? What are their attitudes? We did 2,300 interviews with viewers around the country. It gave us a great road map. I came to Turner with a simple business philosophy. We were going to do the “3 Ps” — position the networks, program to the positioning, and then promote the hell out of the programming and positioning. I told employees if they’re doing anything else, please stop. We will find you something to do within these lanes.

Quote IconOf course, you won’t likely see pictures on Instagram or Facebook of the $2 million camps, chef-cooked meals, the Sherpa helpers and concierge services, or private and pristine toilets. That would mean that the tech elite actually cared about money — which would just go against the entire Burning Man spirit.

At Burning Man, the Tech Elite One-Up One Another - NYTimes.com

Quote IconInstacart charges as little as $3.99 for grocery shopping and delivery. Yet Shah said its shoppers make about $20 an hour, plus tips, which makes profitability seem unlikely, even with the smartest algorithms routing shoppers through grocery stores and city streets. When I told him that, he sounded a lot like Borders back in Webvan’s heyday: “We’re really well funded, so that is not something we’re as worried about,” Shah said. “Growth is the most important factor.”

Delivery Start-Ups Are Back Like It’s 1999 - NYTimes.com

You can’t grow your way out of shitty unit economics when all your costs are already marginal.

Quote IconJohn A. Deighton, a Harvard Business School professor who wrote a case study on Webvan, likes to compare the delivery business to shining shoes. “You make as much profit on one shoe as you do on a thousand shoes,” he said. “There’s just no scale.” In years past, it was difficult for Deighton to even teach his students about Webvan, because its fatal flaws were so obvious. They didn’t understand how the euphoria of the dot-com boom could have obscured its shortcomings. But in the last year, he has been asked to teach it three times. “Something has changed,” he said.

Delivery Start-Ups Are Back Like It’s 1999 - NYTimes.com

Quote IconPure-play online retailers don’t have the economic advantages that many observers ascribe to them. Analyzing the profitability of public e-commerce retailers, including the mighty Amazon, Bain finds that e-commerce’s pricing advantages mostly stem from unsustainably lower profit margins rather than from lower costs. The information technology, distribution centers, shipping, and returns processing required by e-commerce companies can actually cost as much as running physical stores.

E-Commerce Is Not Eating Retail - Darrell Rigby - Harvard Business Review

Megaspice - Wannabe Peace

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A mashup of Spice Girls’ Wannabe instrumentals and Megadeth’s Peace Sells vocals. Inspired by /u/glazedpop on reddit.

Quote IconMr. Horowitz, drawing on his extensive network, held his annual chief executive barbecue last month at his house in Silicon Valley, inviting his portfolio company founders to mingle with luminaries including Kris Jenner, the reality television star and matriarch of the Kardashian family. Mr. Horowitz called her “the greatest reality entrepreneur of all time.”

Venture Capitalists Coddle Entrepreneurs as Royalty - NYTimes.com

Quote IconThere are two time-tested strategies to change the world with technology. One is to build something that some people love but most people think is a toy; the other is to be hyperambitious and start an electric car company or a rocket company. Most of the “intermediate” companies, although it would take a separate long post to explain why, end up not having a big impact.

Stupid Apps and Changing the World - Sam Altman

When availability bias runs wild.

Quote IconOn a recent Friday night, a dozen seekers in loosefitting attire, most in their 20s and 30s, climbed a flight of steps of a mixed-used community space in Bushwick, Brooklyn. After arranging yoga mats and blankets on the floor, they each paid $150, listened to a Colombian shaman and his assistant welcome them in Spanish and English, signed a disclaimer, and accepted large plastic takeout-style containers for vomiting.

Ayahuasca: A Strong Cup of Tea - NYTimes.com

Great lede.