Quote IconOn a recent Friday night, a dozen seekers in loosefitting attire, most in their 20s and 30s, climbed a flight of steps of a mixed-used community space in Bushwick, Brooklyn. After arranging yoga mats and blankets on the floor, they each paid $150, listened to a Colombian shaman and his assistant welcome them in Spanish and English, signed a disclaimer, and accepted large plastic takeout-style containers for vomiting.

Ayahuasca: A Strong Cup of Tea - NYTimes.com

Great lede.

Quote IconThere comes a point in most meetings where everyone is chiming in, except you. Opinions and data and milestones are being thrown around and you don’t know your CTA from your OTA. This is a great point to go, “Guys, guys, guys, can we take a step back here?” Everyone will turn their heads toward you, amazed at your ability to silence the fray. Follow it up with a quick, “What problem are we really trying to solve?” and, boom! You’ve bought yourself another hour of looking smart.

10 Tricks to Appear Smart During Meetings — Medium

Also works with blogging.

Quote IconInnovation and disruption are ideas that originated in the arena of business but which have since been applied to arenas whose values and goals are remote from the values and goals of business. People aren’t disk drives. Public schools, colleges and universities, churches, museums, and many hospitals, all of which have been subjected to disruptive innovation, have revenues and expenses and infrastructures, but they aren’t industries in the same way that manufacturers of hard-disk drives or truck engines or drygoods are industries. Journalism isn’t an industry in that sense, either. Doctors have obligations to their patients, teachers to their students, pastors to their congregations, curators to the public, and journalists to their readers—obligations that lie outside the realm of earnings, and are fundamentally different from the obligations that a business executive has to employees, partners, and investors.

Jill Lepore: What the Theory of “Disruptive Innovation” Gets Wrong : The New Yorker

Quote IconMost big ideas have loud critics. Not disruption. Disruptive innovation as the explanation for how change happens has been subject to little serious criticism, partly because it’s headlong, while critical inquiry is unhurried; partly because disrupters ridicule doubters by charging them with fogyism, as if to criticize a theory of change were identical to decrying change; and partly because, in its modern usage, innovation is the idea of progress jammed into a criticism-proof jack-in-the-box.

Jill Lepore: What the Theory of “Disruptive Innovation” Gets Wrong : The New Yorker

Quote Icon[Musk’s blog post] is 448 words that I believe (despite its length) may well become the Gettysburg Address for entrepreneurship and innovation. Yes I know I am calling it early but it is incredible in its clarity; so much so that I posted it to RapGenius to ensure it is properly annotated.

Digitopoly | Intellectual Property Strategy as PR

Sometimes I feel like I’m taking crazy pills.